The Week In Crosswords

To link or not to link? PJ Lifestyle, a conservative blog, has posted a crossword puzzle “for the aspiring jihadist” and has now posted its answer key. I am not actually linking this one because I find it hateful (you can Google it from that information if you must), but I do think it’s always worth remembering the full range of functions than an art form can fulfill, for good or ill. Crosswords have power whether we choose to exercise it or not.

Is Ruby Schumacher the world’s oldest super-solver?

Can you profile people based on how early they rise and what kind of crosswords they prefer?

Can The Guardian succeed in its ongoing effort to solve what P.G. Wodehouse left unsolved?

Can you solve the NSA’s acrostics from the 1970s?

Can Radio National interview Australian cruciverbalist David Astle?

Could this article‘s claims about “record numbers” of people doing online crosswords because it’s cold in March be any more specious?

ENOUGH WITH THE QUESTIONS! Kids Across, Parents Down goes mobile, and it’s about time. ReadWriteThink offers its own crossword teaching tool.

Ego-solve of the week: @winwithwynn on behalf of Debra Messing. Runner-up: Marble Springs.

The Office has a crossword up (embarrassingly, just a vocabulary crossword) and Office actress Angela Kinsey has a new friend. MythBusters shouts “screw crosswords, do our puzzle,” despite the fact that its puzzle appears to have nothing to do with mythbusting.

About T Campbell

T Campbell is a crossword constructor and comics scriptwriter. Among his cruciverbal accomplishments are the Ubercross C-Spot (the largest puzzle to follow New York Times standard rules), Crossworlds, a collection of 50 science-fiction-themed puzzles, and the forthcoming On Crosswords: Callin' Out Them Squares.
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One Response to The Week In Crosswords

  1. Martin says:

    Ignoring the obviously offensive clues, that PJ Lifestyle crossword is complete garbage construction-wise. Lots of uber-obscure and made up fill. I’d be very surprised if anyone could have come close to solving it.

    -MAS

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